Each month we profile an innovative, growing company from across The Golden Triangle of Cambridge, London and Oxford. This month we speak to Sumit Jamuar, CEO of Global Gene Corp, a company that aims to democratise healthcare through genomics to positively disrupt health outcomes for every individual.

 

Tell us about Global Gene Corp, especially the genomic sequencing work in South Asia. How is this going to support precision medicine? 

Global Gene Corp (GGC) is an innovative genomic data, insights and applications company. We believe that the right set of genomics data and insights are critical foundation for the delivery of precision healthcare.

However, genomics has a huge challenge due to data bias, as according to Nature, 81% of the genomic data and insights is from people of European descent. 60% of the world’s population comprises less than 5% of genomic data and insights; India, which makes up 20% of the world’s population, contributes less than 1% of genomic data. This is a critical problem for precision medicine – as lack of representative data limits our ability to deliver the promise of genomics, whether it is in therapeutics or in the clinic.

GGC is solving this problem by building insights with a focus on Asia, Middle East, Latin America and Africa. We collaborate with pharma and biotech companies, academia and governments to use these understandings to discover and build therapeutic applications and ultimately, get new precision treatments into clinics.

Why did you choose to base GGC’s R&D centre in Cambridge? 

The answer is three-fold. Firstly, we have access to world-class talent; both the quantity and the depth of the talent pool are impressive. For example, The Wellcome Genome Campus is a world-leading centre of genomic research with over 2,600 leading researchers on the campus. Secondly, the innovation and science ecosystem in Cambridge and the Golden Triangle presents a platform for us to conduct global cutting-edge research. Last but not least, the support from the government, investors and interaction with other similar-minded organisations makes Cambridge a fantastic choice.

You came from the world of banking, how do you feel about the transition from finance to science, and how has that background helped? 

I trained as a chemical engineer at Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, and gained an MBA from INSEAD.  I worked at McKinsey & Company and held several senior leadership positions at large financial companies such as Lloyds Bank and SBICAP (UK) Ltd.

My background means I understand the importance of data to derive insights. Further, having led and transformed businesses, I gained extensive experience in and how to develop the right business model that is scalable, to create the team, and allocate the right resources. At GGC, I am fortunate to have built a team of leaders who are passionate about our mission and are focused on solving the problem, and transforming healthcare through genomics.

What is your vision for Global Gene Corp in the future? 

My vision is simply to democratise healthcare through genomics, and make sure we can deliver and contribute to precision treatment. We’ll continue to add tremendous value to the healthcare ecosystem as we collaborate with leading pharmaceutical companies, biotechs, governments and healthcare providers to create insights and Intellectual Property that can have a positive impact on precision healthcare; similar to what Softbank’s ARM has created in the semi-conductor industry.

What would be your advice for international companies looking to expand into the UK market?

The UK is a great place to build IP-based business. My top advice would be to utilise the amazing support system in place, and benefit from the talent pool. Besides, the UK can be used as an R&D base for companies to expand to the global market.

For more information on Global Gene Corp, go to: globalgenecorp.com